The third dimension of surgery videos

Behind the scenes recording the first AOCMF 3-D surgical videos

14 June 2018

3d surgery shanghai aocmf

Let's get the facts straight: 16,000 CMF surgical procedures, 100 surgeons, 480 beds. These are not the health-care figures of a small country but of one highly specialized hospital, the Ninth People's Hospital in Shanghai. With those numbers, top-notch technology and an even more impressive teaching and training mission, it’s not surprising that this hospital is the location of choice for production of AO Foundation surgical videos recorded in 3-D.

Patients requiring treatment by craniomaxillofacial (CMF), plastic, and ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgeons find all specialists at the Ninth People's Hospital—all under one roof, in a 21-floor building. Equipped with the latest diagnostic tools and in-house facilities for pre-operative planning and 3D printing, this hospital represents top-notch technology in all fields of craniomaxillofacial surgery. While the technical equipment is stunning, the teaching and training mission of the hospital is even more impressive. Every year, numerous fellows learn how to best conduct an anastomosis, how to do proper pre-operative planning and when and how to use patient specific implants.

 

Dan Buchbinder Shanghai 3d surgery Daniel Buchbinder and Prof Chenping Zhang preparing the last details of the next procedure

 

The AO Foundation asked Daniel Buchbinder, Chair AO Technical Commission Executive Board, from New York, to find a suitable location for the production of surgical videos, recorded in 3D. Adding the third dimension to high resolution surgery videos makes them more realistic and easier to demonstrate important procedural steps. Buchbinder’s choice for an appropriate location was assertive and quick: The Ninth People's Hospital's Shanghai Head and Neck Cancer Treatment and Translational Medicine Centre guided by the Executive Director, Prof. Chenping Zhang.

 

3d surgery aocmf

With the outstanding technical support of Dynamic Gravity, it was possible to produce—in just one week—a total of five surgical videos, all recorded with great enthusiasm and impressive high technology: two remote controlled beams with high resolution 3-D cameras. The necessary technical equipment occasionally changed the operation theater into a TV studio.

The collaboration between the highly skilled and trained surgeons from the Ninth People's Hospital and the video production engineers worked in perfect harmony, not unlike the performance of the world's best ballets dancers being supported by a virtuosic philharmonic orchestra.

The 3-D videos currently are in post-production. They will be ready to download later this year from the AOCMF website and might also be used in future AO courses.